Conduct of Litigation

So. From January we will be able to venture down the spiral staircase within our ivory towers and peer out of the door to the bustle at street level. Watch where you step.

Yes folks. In the new year the bar will be able to conduct litigation.

Let’s face it, no-one can agree what it amounts to anyway and the pro-McKenzies are all gaily managing their clients affairs from a cafe in croydon anyway, and charging twice the legal aid rates for the privilege.

Can’t wait. Metaphorical red tape up to our eyeballs and a four hundred percent rise in complaints.

AND I shall have to rewrite my “what’s the difference between a barrister and a solicitor?” AGAIN. Remind me – what IS the difference?

5 thoughts on “Conduct of Litigation

  1. “and the pro-McKenzies are all gaily managing their clients affairs from a cafe in croydon anyway, and charging twice the legal aid rates for the privilege.”

    Can you support this statement with any evidence?

  2. CROYDON???? I take great umbridge at that. Im sitting sipping a nice Gin and Tonic at the end of my beautifully manicured mature garden in Chelsea, having just had a quick game of croquet with my fellow mckenzies, todays agenda being a discussion about total domination of the legal profession and self nominating candidates for the bench in the near but coming years……………..

    Seriously I think that if solicitors and even CILEX reps can conduct litigation and have rights of audience (and yes apparently there’s even an ex legal exec Judge now) why shouldn’t barristers be able to conduct litigation? Therein lies the answer to the conundrum. The lines are blurred and frankly I don’t see that this should present any real danger to the independence of the Bar [sic]?

  3. Most of the barristers whom I brief could not run an office or a practice to save their lives. And won’t try.

    I once had to help a member of the criminal Bar who was buying a house – unregistered land which did not help – and thought he could do it himself. Silly ass. My fees for digging him out were more than they would have been if he had come to me in the first place. Let the cobbler(ess) stick to his or even her last.

  4. “Metaphorical red tape up to our eyeballs and a four hundred percent rise in complaints.” How well you have observed what it is to be a solicitor, familoo! You barristers have your problems and we solicitors have ours. I don’t envy yours, and believe me, you shouldn’t envy mine – and by the look of it, don’t.

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